All posts by nilsobrix

SC-920 Alpha 2 Rocket Base (2SCU)

920/483 Reloaded. A new version of the Alpha 1 Rocket Base from 1978/79 packed into two 16x8x8 Space Cargo Units (SCU).

I didn’t have the 920 Alpha-1 Rocket Base as a child, but always wanted to have one. Now, as an AFOL, instead of buying one or building one with single bricks I wanted to build my own version of it.

On my moon base almost everything should be delivered in SCU containers, even the parts of the base themselves. So my Alpha-2 Rocket base had to fit into a pair of containers, too.

It took a while to find a mechanism for the whole launch pad assembly and the rocket to  fit into a 16L SCU, but it finally worked well. The second SCU module is a combination of control unit and garage for the fuel truck.


A look into the control unit.


Like Alpha-1 the whole rocket base can be mounted on a single crater plate.

Special delivery: 2 SCUs for Alpha 2

SCU #1: The launch pad assembly including the rocket

Step 1: Fold out the side panels with the two sections of the rocket


Step 2: Fold out the launch tower


Step 3: Assemble the rocket.


Step 4: Add some fuel and it’s ready for launch.


3, … 2, … 1, … ignition … and lift-off.
The tower folds down for the start. (Sorry for the blurry picture, the AF of my cam isn’t the best – Must have been the vibrations from the starting rocket…) ;-))


SCU #2: Control unit and truck garage


Fold down the ramp and the truck is ready for work.


This is my SCU (Space Container Unit) based Lego Classic Space SC-920 Alpha 2 Rocket Base.
I hope you like it :-))


Bonus picture: LL926 and LL928-C delivering Alpha 2

SCU All-Terrain Transporter

A bigger version of the 6927 All-Terrain Vehicle in 1979 design to transport 16x8x8 Space Cargo Units (SCU).

I wanted to have a kind of all terrain truck to carry 16L SCUs with a system to load and unload the container without extra help. The idea for the loading mechanism was something similar to the dump containers used on contruction sites. I based the design of the vehicle on the classic 6927 All-Terrain Vehicle with some upscaling for the bigger container.

I seperated the upper frame holding the container from the rest of the vehicle, connecting both with three pairs of Technic levers. Pythagoras’ theorem works with Lego, too. So with a 3L horizontal distance and a 4L vertical distance, the length of the lever (from pivot point to pivot point) had to be 5L.

I added a pair of bogie suspension arms for the first two wheels on each side for some extra all-terrain capability. The canopy folds up on the front side to give access to  the cockpit area.

Rear left view

Open the rear end of the lower frame.

Drop the container.

Open the rear end of the upper frame.

And there it is.

Now close the upper frame…

… and the lower frame…

… and there you go…

You can see the bogie suspension arms at work.

This is my Lego Classic Space SCU All-Terrain Transporter.
I hope you like it :-))

SCU All-Terrain Transporter:
[ BrixBlog | MOCpages | flickr ]

SCU Container Carrier (1SCU)

A Container Carrier for 16x8x8 Space Cargo Units (SCU), transformable to be transported as a sigle SCU itself.

I needed something like a container carrier for 16x8x8 SCUs to move them in a space port. At the same time the carrier should be small enough to be transported as a single SCU. So there had to be included some kind of transformation to extend the vehicle frame in a way that made it possible to carry “itself”.

I tried many different designs, in LDD as well as with real bricks until I found a structure that worked. It had to be (1) sturdy enough to carry SCUs, (2) maneuverable with or without an SCU and (3) transformable from transport mode to carrier mode and back with a few and easy steps.

This is the result:

Transport mode: Standard SCU size (16x8x8) with standard fixing points.

Step 1: Fold down the wheels
Step 2: Fold up the steering wheel

Step 3: Slide out the sides
Step 4: Fix the sides with a 8×2 beam plate

Sliding over a 16L SCU.

Lift the SCU up a little and fix it with with the connectors on the sides (each with a pair of 4L axles and 2×2 round bricks connected by a 2×4 plate).

This is my Lego Classic Space SCU Container Carrier.
I hope you like it :-))

Bonus picture:Carry the carrier.

LL 928-C Galaxy Transporter

LL 928-C, my cargo version of the iconic LL 928. It’s able to carry a 8x16x8 “SCU” cargo container/module.

Back in 1978/1979 the LL 928 Galaxy Explorer was the “must have” for all Lego kids. I was lucky to get one for Christmas 1979 and I loved it. So, what’s better than an LL 928? Two ones! :-)) That was my first idea when I thought about expanding my Classic Space fleet a few months ago.

I already had collected a good amount of CS parts, I only needed a second pair of “LL 928” 1×4 bricks to build another LL928. With Bricklink, that wasn’t a problem. But then I thought that just having two identical ships would be quite boring. A new version with new capabilities would be much more exciting and more fun to play with.

One of my ideas was a cargo version of the LL 928, like a modern cargo airplane based on a passenger model. Thinking about that I realized that I still had only one spaceship to transport my new 8x16x8 Space Cargo Units (SCUs), so that would be the purpose of my new LL 928-C (C for cargo).

This time I started the design with real bricks, not with LDD. I started with the wing shape of LL 928, opened on the rear end to have an 8-wide interior cargo area instead of the 6-wide of the original model. The main design idea was an open structure enclosing the cargo like a frame, similar to the 6929 All-Terrain Vehicle or the 6980 Galaxy Commander.

I built the rest of the ship around the cargo area, with a shorter cockpit area placed in front of it.

The rear end is an open frame built with four 1y16 Technic beams and some reinforcement between them. The cargo doors are very similar to the original 928. They are only one stud wider (each of them), with a locking mechanism added in the middle. I had to add an extra plate between the 2×2/2×2 brackets and the rocket engines to get the extra space for the mechanism in the middle.

Side view: You can see the open structure of the cargo area.

Rear view: There are 2 axle pins in the front of the cargo area. These pins and the axles inside the locking mechanism will fix the SCU container/module.


Doors opening. The locking mechanism is quite simple: 2 Technic bricks, a 6L axle and 2 stopper bushes on each side. It’s a compact version of the mechanism that I’ve used for the LL 926 Space Crane.

Pushing a container inside.

One door locked.

And closed, ready for take-off.

Side view with container and closed doors.

Doors open.

Unloading the container.


LL 928-C compared to the original LL 928: The cockpit section starts three studs more in the front and is much shorter. The cargo area is much longer and 2 studs wider. The grey 2×3 slopes in the middle are lifted by one plate to add some extra rigidity to the frame below. The additional rocket engines on the side each have 2 post instead of 3.

Rear view: The extra two studs in the width are widening the rear wing section, too. The rocket engines have to be placed a little lower to get space for the locking mechanism between them.

“Birds eye” front view. The LL 928-C really looks familiar.

So this is my Lego Classic Space LL 928-C, a cargo version of LL 928. For me it looks like a semi truck for space transport.
I hope you like it :-)).

OK, here is another transporter for my “SCU” Containers.
I think it’s time for some payload…

LL929 Starfleet Voyager (6929 Mod)

 

My 1979 version of the iconic Starfleet Voyager.

The Starfleet Voyager was one of the Lego model I always wanted to have. My cousin had one, one of my friends, too, but I didn’t.

A few years ago I found out that my brother did also “have” one, in a weird kind of way: He had the infamous 1593 “Super Model”, a quite ugly spaceship made with the parts from the Starfleet Voyager and the 6880 Surface Explorer. I didn’t know that before, but back in the early 80s it wasn’t easy to get the building  instructions, either.

Now I had three ideas: I could search in my CS boxes for the parts (I’ve traded my Playmobil with my brother’s Lego a few years ago, so his parts are now mine). I could also buy a set on Bricklink. And last, but not least, I could build a modified version of the model using the iconic grey/blue/trans-yellow colour scheme from 1979/1980. As you can see, I chose the third idea.

But I didn’t just want to replace the trans-blue parts with trans-yellow ones and the white parts with blue ones. I tried to modify the design in a way that the Starfleet Voyager looked like a member of the original 1979 space fleet. For that I also eliminated all the parts that were new in 1981 and replaced them with parts available in 1979.

Finally I bought a set of custom printed bricks with “LL 929” Lettering. In fact, the original Starfleet Voyager has the set number 6929. So after the change to 4-digit model numbers and all Space models starting with a six, it is the legitimate “LL 929”.

And now it’s time for some photos:

The cockpit section is new, with one more brick in height above the wings and one less below.

The “backbone” is new, too. I chose to use Technic beams to create a more rigid structure. I also changed the wing shape of the rear part replacing a pair of 4×4 wedge plates with a pair of 4×8 ones.

The cargo area looks quite the same as on the original model. I only changed the inner supports for the cargo box to create room for bigger boxes. Instead of a 4x6x3 box the ship can now carry a 6x6x4 box without changing the exterior shape.

So this is my “LL 929” version of the “Starfleet Voyager” in 1979 design. I hope you like it :-)).

MOCpages Backup: VW T1 Renntransporter “Rennstall Bunker” (4-Wide)

A MOCpages Backup

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Added March 11, 2013

VW T1 Renntransporter "Rennstall Bunker" (4-Wide)

The Volkswagen T1 flatbed “Renntransporter” with longer wheelbase as used by the “Rennstall Bunker” in the late 1950s

I already built the 550 spyder with the T1 Renntransporter in mind. I wanted to build this team in 4-wide scale since I first saw Senator Chinchillas fantastic big version in the Classic Race Teams group.

So this is basically a 4-wide version of his model.

I already had made some 4-wide T1, especially my small version of the 10220 Camper. So the basic design of the T1 was already there.

I wanted to have the Porsche and the T1 as 4-wide models, so I had to leave the idea of hinges for the side panels. Instead of hinges and tiles like on my earlier double cab flatbed Transporter I used three 2×4 tiles on each side. To imitate the opening of the side panels the tiles can be positioned 1 stud lower.

Ah, the cargo has arrived ;-))
Art Bunker (USA) / Charles Wallace (USA) finished the Sebring 12 Hours 1957 (the 2nd race of the 1957 FIA World Sportscar Championship) 8th overall and 1st in the Sport 1500 “Class F”, driving Bunker’s Porsche 550 spyder.

On the flatbed between the wheels of the loaded car there is room for two 1×8 tiles.

The tiles can be used as rails for a ramp to load and unload the Transporter.

There is goes…

And there it is, ready to go…

Credits: Please take a look at the 4-wide T1 models built by Isaac, Hot Rod, Dylan, Klingus and Ben and you’ll find one or another detail I used on this model.

Bonus photo:
The rest of the Volkswagen T1 family: Camper, Flatbed Transporter and Panel Van.

So this is my VW T1 Renntransporter as used by the Rennstall Bunker. I hope you like it :-))

MOCpages Backup: Lamborghini Countach LP400 V2.0 (4-Wide)

A MOCpages Backup

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Added May 3, 2015

Lamborghini Countach LP400 V2.0 (4-Wide)

Almost completely new: The 4-wide version of my favourite super car, the Lamborghini Countach LP400

I’ve built the Coutach quite some time ago. Last week I was looking at photos of a real Countach and comparing it to my Lego version I realized that the proportions didn’t really match. The Countach was recognizable, but looked a little strange. So I started to redesign it with LDD. This is the result:

The new side view. The complete roof section is 1 plate flatter and 1 stud shorter, now. I also came back to the rims with smaller diameter and thicker tyres which are closer to the original. Credits again to Rhys for the air intakes on the side panel.

The new front: A slope for the front hood, new wheel arches and a more pointed “nose”. A 2x4x1 slope has replaced the two 1x4x1 slopes after taking the pictures (I just couldn’t wait longer for the Bricklink order…)

The new rear end: Everything one plate flatter.

Some more pictures…

And a look around on the platform:




 

Bonus photos:

Compared to the old version in the bottle. There’s quite a difference.

And compared to the “original”, a 1/43 scale model.

So this is my new 4-wide Lego Lamborghini Countach LP400. I hope you like it as much as I do :-))

MOCpages Backup: Porsche 959 (4-Wide)

A MOCpages Backup

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Added July 10, 2013

Porsche 959 (4-Wide)

My 4-wide version of Porsche’s Group B Beast, the 959.

What happens if you give anabolic steroides to a Porsche 911? You get a 959! 4-wheel drive, 6-speed gearbox, the first engine with a sequential twin-turbo and an amazing “bodykit” combined with the classic design of the 911.

The 959 was first built as a Group B Rally car and finished 1st and 2nd in the 1986 Paris-Dakar Rally. The street version was the world fastest production car when it hit the streets (Vmax = 195 mph / 317 kph). It was first beaten by the Ferrari F40.

I wanted to build the 959 quite for a while, but I have to admit that Loek Marcus was faster. He was the first buider I know who made a 4-wide 959. But it was Tom’s (DeTomaso Pantera’s) “fault” that I really started building this one. He wrote a comment for my latest 911 that mentioned the 959.

I started with the 911 and tried to combine it with some details from my Audi Sport quattro S1. It became quite difficult to combine the “3-wide” center section of the S1 with the side panels of the 911. There was always a “half plate offset” in the way. But I finally found a solution.

Enough words, time for the photos:

The rear end with the big wing:
This design was only possible with the new 1×2 “half bows”

The “spy” shot:

Back to 1989:
Accolade presents…
The Duel – Test Drive II

(If that doesn’t mean anything to you, take a look here)

F40 vs. 959
3, 2, 1 … Go! 🙂

The beauty and the beast … But which one is which? ;-))

My 4-wide Porsche family:
911, 914, 550 spyder and 959.

So this is my 4-wide LEGO Porsche 959.
I hope you like it. :-))

MOCpages Backup: 1992 Movie Batmobile (4-Wide)

A MOCpages Backup

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Added July 17, 2012

1992 Movie Batmobile (4-Wide)

My 4-wide version of the Batmobile as seen in the 1992 Tim Burton Movie “Batman Returns” including some extra functions…

As I had to wait for some parts to arrive, I had some time for a little redesign of my new 4-wide Batmobile after posting my preview. I’ve changed the shape of the roof section and the rear bat wings to get closer to the original.

Left side view: I love these new black 45 deg wedges with the cutout…

Rear right view: Afterburner on!

Front view: That’s a big air intake for that turbine.

And now the quiz question for the Tim Burton Batman movie fans: What’s the main difference between the 1989 and the 1992 Batmobile?

Let’s go! …

… 1 …

… 2 …

… 3 …

… Tadaa! – The Batmissile!

Front view: Better get away!

Rear view: Just like the cops in the movie saw it ;-))

Whoosh!

A little turn to the left …

… and a little turn to the right.

Nice side effect: The 4 wheel steering works really well …

… and the “parking mode”, too ;-))

The transformation of the axles: Batmobile mode …

… and Batmissile mode.

Detail view of the axles. The rigid tubes are like custom made 3mm bars :-))

And the “money shot”…

So this is my 4-wide LEGO Burton Batmobile including a 2-wide Batmissile. I hope you like it :-))

Update October 1, 2012:
New “bat wings” on the rear end of the Batmobile.

And there is the Batmissile.